Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Oxidative Stress and Cancer: Representing that your medical condition is "stable" in order to collect pain and suffering claims from Depuy.

I hope everyone had a great holiday!

As a result of my reading the offer from Depuy to allow claims to be made in Australia for pain and suffering, I thought that it would interesting to remind patients of the  relationship between oxidative stress and Cancer.

How is this related to the litigation process in Australia?  In order to collect on this claim, you have to have a "stable condition."  Now, I have no idea what that means given the lack of "good data" on the systemic effects of the chromium and cobalt on your bodies.  In short, how does a patient claim they are stable?

We know from the medical journal article  "Evidence thus Far" that oxidative stress is generated from the chemical decomposition of the metals in the body.  I have published extensively on this.  See these URLs for more background on this/ especially those posts  starting with 7a:

Metal-on-metal bearings: THE EVIDENCE SO FAR

Does early intervention prevent bone/soft tissue loss: What is the outcome of revision surgery?

Do we know the threshold for revision surgery? (2of 7)

Is there an accepted cut-off level for blood metal ion levels? (3 of 7)

What is the significance of Gender with the Metal on Metal hips (4 of 7)

What is the frequency of adverse metal reactions with the MoM hips? (5 of 7)

What do plain radiographs, ultrasound, MRI and CT offer the Depuy hip patient (6 of 7)

Systemic effects of metal debris (7a of 7)

Systemic effects of metal debris (7b of 7)

Systemic effects of metal debris (7c of 7)

Systemic effects of metal debris (7d of 7)

Systemic effects of metal debris (7e of 7); excerpts from the committee on Mutagneicity

Systemic effects of metal debris (7f of 7); excerpts from the Committee on Mutagenicity

Systemic effects of metal debris (7g of 7); excerpts from the Committee on Mutagenicity

Systemic effects of metal debris (7g of 7); excerpts from the Committee on Mutagenicity

Systemic effects of metal debris (7h of 7); excerpts from the Committee on Mutagenicity

Systemic effects of metal debris (7i of 7); excerpts from the Committee on Mutagenicity

Systemic effects of metal debris (7j of 7); excerpts from the Committee on Mutagenicity

Systemic effects of metal debris (7k of 7); excerpts from the Committee on Mutagenicity

Systemic effects of metal debris (7L of 7); excerpts from the Committee on Mutagenicity

Systemic effects of metal debris (7M of 7); excerpts from the Committee on Mutagenicity

Systemic effects of metal debris (7N of 7); excerpts from the Committee on Mutagenicity
 
 
Now that we have established a  connection between the oxidative stress, chromium and cobalt and cancer, lets look at the general literature in Pub med.
 
Query one:  How many articles discuss the link between oxidative stress AND cancers:  11, 391 peer review journal articles.
 
Query two:  How many journal articles discuss : Oxidative stress CAUSES cancer:  5, 856 journal articles.
 
Query three: How many journal articles discuss oxidative stress and chromium and cobalt:  30
 
Query four: How many journal articles discuss oxidative stress and orthopaedic surgery:  141
 
 
With all of these publications discussing the relationship between  metal debris, cancer and mutagenicity, how is a patient supposed to claim they have a "stable medical condition?"
 
Here is a brief overview on the chemistry of this process in case you needed to be reminded :
 
Detailed studies in the past two decades have shown that redox active metals like iron (Fe), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co) and other metals undergo redox cycling reactions and possess the ability to produce reactive radicals such as superoxide anion radical and nitric oxide in biological systems. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis may lead to oxidative stress, a state where increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelms body antioxidant protection and subsequently induces DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and other effects, all symptomatic for numerous diseases, involving cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurological disorders (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease), chronic inflammation and others. The underlying mechanism of action for all these metals involves formation of the superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical (mainly via Fenton reaction) and other ROS, finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and other exocyclic DNA adducts.
 
Here again is the diagram illustrating the process that occurs when Cr and Co are introduced into the body.

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