Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Serum and urine metal levels in patients with metal-on-metal surface arthroplasty. (Ion toxicity 8 of 14)

J Mater Sci Mater Med. 2002 Dec;13(12):1227-34.
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Room 756, Cohn Research Building, Rush Presbyterian, St. Luke's Medical Center, 1735 West Harrison St., Chicago, IL 60612-3833, USA. Anastasia_K_Skipor@rush.edu

Abstract

The resurgence of metal-on-metal articulating surfaces for hip arthroplasty has also heightened concerns about the degree and magnitude of metal particle generation and the accompanying increase in circulating metal ion concentrations. In this study, we measured the concentration of chromium in serum and urine and the concentration of cobalt in serum in twenty-five patients with modern metal-on-metal surface arthroplasty of the hip in a prospective manner. The results showed that the mean post-operative chromium in serum levels were 22-fold, 23-fold and 21-fold higher at 3, 6 and 12 months post-operative, respectively, than pre-operative levels. The mean post-operative cobalt in serum levels were 8-fold, 7-fold and 6-fold higher at 3, 6 and 12 months post-operative, respectively, than pre-operative levels. The mean post-operative chromium in urine levels were 9-fold, 10-fold and 14-fold higher at 3, 6 and 12 months post-operative, respectively, than pre-operative levels. The values seen in this study with the current generation of surface arthroplasties are: (a) lower than those seen in an earlier generation of surface arthroplasties; (b) in the same range as those observed in association with metal-on-metal conventional total hip replacements, which typically have smaller head sizes; (c) higher than values observed in patients with conventional metal-on-polyethylene articulating couples.

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