Friday, February 11, 2011

Cancer risk after metal on metal and polyethylene on metal total hip arthroplasty. (Ion Toxicity series 3 of 14)

Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1996 Aug;(329 Suppl):S280-9.
Central Military Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

The incidence of cancer after metal on metal total hip arthroplasty (McKee-Farrar) and polyethylene on metal total hip arthroplasty (Brunswik, Lubinus) was compared with that of the general population in Finland. The mean followup time for the patients who had metal on metal total hip arthroplasty was 15.7 (9092 person years) and for the patients who had polyethylene on metal total hip arthroplasty it was 12.5 years (19,846 person years). One hundred thirteen malignant cancers were observed in patients who had metal on metal total hip arthroplasty and 212 were observed in patients who had polyethylene on metal total hip arthroplasty. The standardized incidence ratio for all cancers of the metal on metal arthroplasty group was 0.95 (95% confidence limits 0.79-1.13) and that of the polyethylene on metal arthroplasty group was 0.76 (95% confidence limits 0.68-0.86). The risk of total cancer in the patients who had metal on metal total hip arthroplasty was 1.23-fold compared with that of the patients who had polyethylene on metal total hip arthroplasty. Both groups had significantly less lung cancer than the general population: the leukemia incidence in the patients who had metal on metal total hip arthroplasty was slightly increased (observed to experienced 7/3.03, standardized incidence ratio 0.61; 95% confidence limits 0.17-1.56). The leukemia rate of the patients who had metal on metal total hip arthroplasty was 3.77-fold compared with that of the patients who had polyethylene on metal total hip arthroplasty, but this difference was not statistically significant. No sarcomas were observed at the site of the prosthesis. The incidence of the other forms of cancers did not differ significantly from those in the general population. The observed variation in the incidence of different cancers among patients who had total hip arthroplasty compared with the general population suggests that factors other than total hip arthroplasty play a major role in the origin of cancer.

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